IAGC

IAGC Positions

The G&E Industry’s Role in the Energy Transition:
The IAGC recognizes the importance of environmental stewardship and the integral part the G&E industry plays in responding to the potential global health and safety risks associated with a dynamic climate.
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Closure Areas:
The IAGC and the geophysical and exploration industry are committed to conducting operations in an environmentally responsible manner.
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Cumulative Impacts:
The notion of cumulative impacts relating to seismic surveys and exploration activities has been raised in various jurisdictions around the world as something which must be accounted for in exploration access.  The best available data strongly support a conclusion that there is an extremely low likelihood that cumulative impacts result from seismic survey activity.
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Dolphin Shutdowns:
The IAGC does not support dolphin shutdowns and encourages exemptions for all dolphin species regardless of whether a dolphin is attempting to bow-ride.
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Precaution and The Precautionary Principle:
The IAGC recognizes the complexities and uncertainties inherent in marine environmental management and supports appropriate measures to minimize potential and actual risks.
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Zooplankton:
The IAGC remains open to all emerging new scientific information.  However, we are troubled with the results of the most recent zooplankton study by McCauley et al. which suggests but does not prove the conclusion that seismic survey air sources negatively impact zooplankton.
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Mitigation Measures:
Mitigation measures are implemented to reduce real threats to marine species. The IAGC supports seismic survey mitigation measures that are grounded in the best available science and consistent with existing practices that are proven to be effective and operationally feasible.
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Duplicative Surveys:
There is a misunderstanding that seismic surveys covering the same geographical areas are in some way “duplicative” or overlapping, suggesting that these surveys are not necessary or the number can be “reduced” in some form by sharing data.  On the contrary, there is no such thing as a duplicative survey.
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Time Sharing:
The IAGC has established time sharing best practices to provide guidance to the geophysical industry for efficiently and effectively engaging in time sharing when marine seismic crews are in close proximity of each other and are faced with potential seismic interference, environmental restrictions, adverse weather, permit restrictions, or other similar obstacles that may impede simultaneous operations.
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Vessel Beaching:
The IAGC encourages members to explore alternative decommissioning options consistent with environmental best practices.
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Vessel Separation Distances:
Various countries have proposed draft regulations requiring minimum separation distances or “buffer zones” between seismic survey vessels as a purported mitigation tool that would create corridors for marine mammals to travel.
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Lowest Practicable Source Levels (LPSL):
The IAGC cautions against implementation of seemingly simple solutions like striving for lower practicable source levels which can have unintended negative consequences and should be fully thought out when making any decisions about array design.
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Sound Source Verification:
Sound Source Verification (SSV) is intended to verify modeled predictions of how anthropogenic sound, including that produced by seismic survey sources, propagates in the environment.
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Emerging Geophysical Sound Source Technologies:
Emerging technologies should be driven by market forces, and IAGC opposes any requirement by regulators to use a given technology for conducting geophysical and geological surveys.
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